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under regime of gadhafi and saw brutality of gadhafi killing his own people using all type weapons. he was the first american representative to go to benghazi, my hometown. every member of the delegation came to this country. when i speak about steven they say yes, chris, we know him. he talked to the people. he meet with the people. he knows their suffering. the main thing, that he trusts them and when they rised against gadhafi, he supported them. chris, it is a great loss for libya. we lost him as a friend and man that understands the history of the people of libya before and after. chris, he built the bridge between libya and the united states. a bridge of love, of hope. we never believed one day we would be able to raise against this dictatorship. i knew chris after he came back. i knew chris more. he would come to the house and we play tennis. after the tennis we come back home and have libyan breakfast. he is a man of principles and he is serious. i agree he never speaks about himself, what achievement he made. he is a guy when you look for him again. this is kind of different e
by death, according to a law carried over from moammar gadhafi reign. >> we are a 100% muslim country. this issue is not negotiable. >> reporter: the four missionaries are in custody in benghazi. the group is made up of a swedish american, an egyptian, a south african, and a south korean. libyan officials allow sharif to speak to the media. he says he was brought here from the moment they arrested him. and that he has been treated respectfully and not abused. he went on to admit the group was in libya to spread christianity. an official presence said there were also espionage allegations against him because he refused to meet with anything anyone from his embassy. ramsey said he declined because he knew he would get little help from egypt. >> george: gary joins us now. he has been to libya since the revolution and he is back from other parts of north africa. and joining us by skype is todd neddelson, from voice of the martyrs, here to talk about the persecution in east africa. gentlemen, welcome. gary, this country, liberated by nato, and now we have this issue of preaching the gospel
of the tourist sites in libya. he was trailed by gadhafi security men who were obviously intimidating to other tourists. as she recounted it, he reached over to one of the men, stole his camera out of his hands and started taking pictures of the men who had been following him. they were so dumbfounded that they had to laugh. after a quick conversation, chris convinced them to stand down. from a colleague at the embassy in tripoli i learned chris had a humble style of diplomacy libyans responded to after he became ambassador and returned to tripoli, the embassy posted a photo, ordering a juice in a cafe. that went viral because libyans were amazed at the site of a senior government official doing mundane activities without a huge entourage and demanding vip treatment. chris had a great knowledge of libyan history and culture. he would often crack jokes with government counter parts. not just in arabic but in the libyan dialect, which the libyans loved to hear him speak. another told me when i saw him in may as newly appointed ambassador in tripoli he had not changed, despite the promotion and a
. they say different groups took the arms across the border after the fall of gadhafi. the video shows the transient life the militants led in the desert. they moved frequently from one location to another. mokhtar belmokhtar is believed to have been behind the attacks in algeria. they say the group gathered in southern libya and then crossed the border. what's not clear, though, is how the fighters managed to penetrate the military security forces andrivate guas to take control of the plant. a journalist follows the militant group in northern mali last year for two weeks. >> translator: they had their way in the desert. they were free. no one bothered them. the algerian attack got their ssage ross. ancountry cod be theext target at any time. >> the man from niger who led the attack died when the algerian military stormed the plant. but the whereabouts of mokhtar are not known, meaning the threat of more terror attacks in the region looms. nhk world. >>the si of a ilding collapsed in a disaster that -- people across the country have been working to get better prepared for the next time
of the uprising that crumbled gadhafi. he promised that islamic law would be the main source of legislation. since gadhafi was ousted. that country has been plagued with war. >> those gold bars are thought to be worth at least $250,000. the city lost 3,000 people and 40,000 buildings when the 9.0 earthquake and tsunami hit back in 2009. that money will go to the rebuilding of the city's port. >> the u.s. is warning americans to be careful at one of peru's favorite site. but the u.s. embassy announced a criminal group may have plans to kidnap american tourists. the threats may be connected to a rebel group known as the shining path. peru recently began a crack down against its cocaine legislation. you can go to ktvu.com and click on web links. >>> and after an outcry from customers, maker's mark announced that it will stop watering down its popular bourbon and will restore all bottles to the original 90 proof formula starting tomorrow. the company was adding a little more water to the original formula to stretch the stock. >>> you could have wifi but you still could be out of touch in the air. >>>
the fall of moammar gadhafi. the video shows the transient life the militants led in the desert. they moved frequently from one location to another. mokhtar belmokhtar is one of the senior members shown in the video. he has links to al qaeda. analysts believe he's the mastermind behind the attack in algeria. algerian officials say the militants planned and prepared well. they say the group gathered in southern libya and then crossed the border. what's not clear though is how the fighters managed to penetrate the military security forces and private guards to take control of the plant. mauritanian journalist, mohammed mahmud abu ah-ma'ali, follows the militant group in northern mali last year for two weeks. >> translator: they had their way in the desert. they were free. no one bothered them. the algerian attack got their message across. any country could be the next target at any time. >> reporter: the man from niger who led the attack died when the algerian military stormed the plant. but the whereabouts of the belmokhtar, the top leader, are not known, meaning the threat of more terror at
after the fall of moammar gadhafi. the video shows the transit end life the militants led in the desert. they moved frequently from one location to another. this is one of the senior members shown in the video. he has links to al qaeda. analysts believe he's the mastermind behind the attack in algeria. algerian officials say the militants prepared well. they say that the group gathered in southern libya and then crossed the border. what's not clear, though, is how the fighters managed to penetrate the military security forces and private guards to take control of the plant. this journalist follows the militant group in northern mali last year for two weeks. >> translator: they had their way in the desert. they were free. no one bothered them. the algerian attack got their message across. any country could be the next target at any time. >> reporter: the man from niger who led the attack died when the algerian military stormed the plant. but the whereabouts about the top leader is not known. meaning the threat of more terror attacks in the region looms. >>> and we could be seeing more ev
or sirral and brutalization of the people you. see the same pat turn. gadhafi, the eastern tribes, the benghazi people. so the pattern exists throughout the case studies we have looked at, and we have looked at 40 case studies. so it makes it a global study of what is going on in the world. >> host: if you would take pakistan as a case study and walk us through the different tribes and the situation in your home country. >> guest: pakistan is a central piece of the study. why? because the tribal areas is one of the most targeted places on earth for the drone program waziristan is one of the most highly tribal societies on the face of the earth and it's traditionally never been completely conquered or subdued or incorporated into any government. it is part of pakistan, and yet it maintains -- the tribes maintain their own independence and great pride in their open culture and old traditions. now, what they're finding -- i'm talking about the ordinary tribes and not these bad guys -- what the ordinary tribes have found -- think about it. put yourself in the shoes of the tribe and li
gadhafi, choose to act in a way that's anathema to us. we are lucky because of our limited involvement that we have a government there that is a moderate government, a government of people that try to pull ambassadors meeting murdered rather than push them into one. the world will see in syria this opportunist islamists extremists groups and other local groups have come to the forefront. they are well armed and so a rebellion that began as one at least in part secular and had no religious basis and was brought together by universal opposition to bishara lessard is not infiltrated by all sorts of al qaeda and related groups. so when assad files come as a question, when assad falls, what will be left is a well armed seething feuding mass on the border of iraq, turkey, jordan, lebanon and israel. it is as if we live in a sand as the world to think the implications of the conflict have absolutely no meaning for our national security. it's a disaster and what we can do now is try and contain a disaster and hasten the movement of assad out and ensure whoever is in charge actually is a group
anniversary are you of the start of the uprising that toppled long time dictator moammar gadhafi. today the president said libyans must resolve their differents to rebuild the nation. since 2011 the country has been wracked by lawlessness and economic he woes. the libyan leader promised that islamic law would be the main source of legislation. >>> in syria rebel forces are focusing their latest assaults on three strategic airports. as nick paton reports that they offer up stark images how fast they fear the assad regime my react. >> reporter: around aleapo they can see the key international airport, a hub for cargo planes and artery for what is left of the regime in syria north. it's mainly surrounded by islamist fighters better armed carrying the weapons they took from the army bridged that fled their advance. the battle of the airports, rebels say began tuesday. to aleppo's east, kweiris airport, north is menneg, besieged for week and southeast is nairab, also encircled by rebels. the aim, to deny the regime place as to land fighter jets and supplies in the north. that would be a majo
anniversary of the uprising that toppled moammar gadhafi. tens of thousands of people filled tripoli's tahrir's quer libya's leader called for unity and promised to not allow libya to become what he called an incubator of terrorism and violence. >>> to the vatican now where the pope will be out of the public eye for the entire week for the traditional lenten period of reflection and prayer. when he does reemerge, it will be to say his final goodbyes. abc's david wright reports from rome. >> reporter: at least 50,000 roman catholics came to say goodbye. but the pope kept it business as usual. even though he'll appear in that window just one more time before he makes way for someone else. >> the crowd was here for benedict today. it mattered probably more to them than him. >> reporter: behind the scenes, the focus also already turned to choosing his successor. a process that's always followed strict rules. perhaps the cardinals won't wait the usual 15 days to start the election. but from so quarters strong objection. only the pope can change pope law. for him to do so now might look like he's m
? it was an international coalition. if there was an american citizen to travel to algeria join the pro-gadhafi army said it was a major durational leader preannouncing to libya were straight out of the persistent, but american forces and allies. based on the memo, dated it would've been justified justified or this provides justification to engage in that instance? >> the answer to the memo probably not because the person would not be a senior operational leader person eminent threat of violence to the united states. >> my question is the logic of what they're saying, why is it so port if the aumf is not critical, al qaeda versus someone fighting gadhafi. it's very logical distinction distinction between those two if you don't think the bellinger is critical? >> this administration is relying only on the aumf. a lot of this water 12 years later how it could be all of those in different countries around the world who may have only been 10 years old in 2001 still falls under the aumf. it's a good set of questions as to whether this administration would remind the president constitutional authority to strik
with several other touregs already conscripted into it, and he convinced them that if gadhafi falls, we can take advantage of this, take the weapons. now we are are better equipped. bring well-trained individuals, come back to mali, and then we, you know, lay down the law and want the grievances dealt with. in the summer of 2011, mahanga dies in a serious car accident. i never got a true answer whether he was killed or whether it was a real accident. they agreed and several toureg agreed so they get together and meet in a place in the northern part of mali right in the algeria border, and they start discussing all the things that went wrong in previous rebellions, and how do we deal with our grievances. in the discussions they said, well, there's several things we don't do in previous rebellions. number one, we really didn't have good media press. we didn't know how to tell the world what we were doing. they relied on the youth, the toureg youth that studied in europe or other places to kind of push forward on the media prompt. he got together and said we were not equipped or in a cohe'sive
was not focused on what happened there. but look what happened in libya. gadhafi was trying to put down a rebellion in his inimitable style, and there's no doubt 100 years ago he would have succeeded. he did not this time because all these international organizations focused on what he was doing. and before he could come in and torch benghazi and kill all the rebels, we and our they toe allies intervened to stop that. now, in the case of syria we have not intervened, but certainly other outside powers have. and the rebels have been able to get support, for example, from the gulf states which keeps them from being swiftly -- simply swept off the board. bashar assad in turn gets support from iran. so at the moment the war is more or less stalemated because both sides have, you know, some degree of support, but it's not overwhelming. assad is very unpopular, but the insurgents have not been able to push him out all the way. but assad, and this goes back to a point i was making earlier about the incredible importance of legitimacy, i would say for most syrians assad lacks legitimacy. he's a
. gadhafi was trying to put down in his style and he didn't repeat this time however because the world that in news media and the united states and all these international organizations focused on what he was doing it before he could come in and torch speed and kill all of the rebels we intervened to stop that. now in the case of syria, we haven't intervened, but certainly other outside powers have and they have been able to get support for example from the gulf states which keeps them from being simply swept off the board. he gets support from iran so at the moment the war is more or less stalemated because both sides have some degree of support but it's not overwhelming. she's very unpopular but the insurgents haven't been able to push him out all the way. but this goes back to the point i was making earlier about the importance of legitimacy i would say for most lacks legitimacy especially for the sunni majority of the country because he is part of a minority. however he does have support in the community and he does have support among some of the other minorities because they are a
in the overthrow and murder of gadhafi in libya, and then the third question is, um, as a radical democrat, what are your thoughts about kwame kramer as a great philosopher king of africa? because he faced a situation in ghana th(u he declared himself president for life as a necessity against western imperial efforts to remove him through his adversaries in ghana. >> host: kwame, are you originally from ghana? >> caller: yes, i am. >> host: all right. thank you for calling in and holding. randall robinson, imperialism, comparing it to the roman empire. >> guest: well, the united states has a military footprint in over 90 countries. one of the reasons we are so resistant to ratifying the international criminal court is that we don't want to see a circumstance under which any american might ever be hauled before the international criminal court and, for anything at any time. and so for countries that don't have that kind of of exposure, that are not involved in a number of wars at the same time and are not involved with so many countries in a military fashion, they don't have the same risks that t
gadhafi in the middle east -- like gaddafi in the middle east, or say we were to go after assad, it seems like we create a vacuum. terrorists seem to come in droves and take over the system. it is almost like the george orwell's "animal farm." you get a worse system taking over from what was already there. a problemow if it's with united states getting involved and taking out leaders. we took out an war sadat -- anwar sadat, and look what happened there. we take cities like this and put money back into the economy. host: i think we got the point. let's get an answer from representative engel. guest: first of all, thanks for the working-class connection. my dad was a welder. he was an iron worker. a very proud member of the ironworkers union. i grew up with those kinds of feelings, caring about working people in this country. the statistics seem to be going in that direction with unemployment going down and joblessness going down as well. you make a very good point. the problem with our participation is that you really do not know whether you are going to go out of the frying pan into the
crypted in to the military. and so convinced them that gadhafi falls maybe we can take advantage of this and take the weapons with now or better equipped, you know, well trained individuals and come back to mali and we, you know, we laid down the law saying we want our grievances dealt with. so in the process of this happening in the summer of 2011, he ties in a car accident. i have never gotten the true answer whether he was actually killed or whether it was a real accident. but he had several touaregs agreed. they get together and they meet in a place which is in the northern part of mali right in the algeria border and started discussing all the things that went wrong in previous rebellion and how do we deal with the grievances? the discussions they said there's several things that we didn't do in previous rebellion. number one, we really didn't have good media press. we didn't know how to telled holder what we were doing. they relied on the touareg youth that studied in europe and other places to push forward on the media front. then they got together and said we weren't equi
a black coalition to stop gadhafi for massacring his people and a ceasefire is holding in gaza. august aims, but not nearly enough. ongoing turmoil point to difficulties identifying fractured countries and building credible democratic in 22 shands. the impact between israel and palestinians shows little sign of easing. in syria, deicide regime continues to slaughter his people and enter communal conflict. iran is pursuing its nuclear ambitions and sponsoring an extremist across the globe may continue to face terrorist threats from yemen and north africa. will not see inherent to attend the united states has all the solutions to these problems. we do not. but we are clear about the future we seek for the region and its people. we won a region at peace with and the world, where people live in dignity, not dictatorship. the entrepreneurship drives, not extremism. there's no doubt get into that future will be difficult and will require every single tool in our toolkit. as you can't have true peace in the middle east without addressing both the act of conflicts in the underlying causes. you
in egypt tunisia and libya. the united states and our partners build a broad coalition to stop gadhafi from massacring its people and a cease-fire is holding in gaza. all good things but not nearly enough. ongoing turmoil in egypt and libya pointed to difficulties that unifying fractured countries and building incredible democratic institutions. the impasse between israel and the palestinian shows little sign of easing. and syria at the assad regime continues to slaughter its people and intercommunal conflict. iran is pursuing a nuclear ambition and fostering violent extremists across the globe and we continue to face real terrorist threats from yemen and north africa. so i will not stand here and pretend that the united states has all the solutions. we do not. but we are clear about the future we seek for the region and its people. we want to be a region at peace with itself in and the world where people live in dignity and not dictatorship, where entrepreneurship thrives not extremism. and there's no doubt that getting to that future will be difficult and will require every single tool in
thanks to the sole diminution she pulled to get gadhafi out of office and out of power. no, i don't think any of those will be her legacy. they see them as something that is vfr much to her credit. >> let's talk about chuck hagel's confirmation. i'm sure you saw it. it was great television. a lot of fireworks between hagel and john mccain. take a look. >> we are correct or incorrect. yes or no? >> my reference to the refer -- >> the question is were you right or wrong. that's a pretty straight forward question. i would like to answer and then you are free to elaborate. >> i am not going to give you a yes or no answer. >> joe, first of all, let me ask you this. the white house didn't jump to his defense after that stuff. why not? >> who didn't? >> the white house. the white house didn't jump to his defense. >> the white house has a sense that he has a good chance to be confirmed and everybody know that is the hearings will be contentious. no doubt there will be a lot of consengz and a lot of bad blood between this senator and colleagues and many who question his stance with regard to iran
a connection between the gadhafi regime and what's unfolded in mali. nobody went back and said that the chaos that presently obtains in libya, does that have to be addressed to get the situation in mali enhanced? and if i could ask just a similar question. people pointed to the fact that if we look at that subregion, that niger appeared to be somewhat better shape than other places despite the fact it's a bad neighborhood, is there any way that we could involve a policy that would immunize niger from getting infected with the same kind of disease that obtains in northern nigeria or northern mali? >> thank you very much. >> thank you very much. i'm an independent analyst here in washington. the mali problem is the most complex i have come across in 40 years, so it's hard to deal with all of it now. there are things said that i think are right on the money. there are others which i disagree with, but i think one that has been left, the u.s. role has been talked about, but i think the first question is why should the u.s. really care? why should americans care? i think that's the issue that shou
. can you help me understand what's happening in eastern libya right now with the gadhafi arms cachet that was not considered after the nato activity and libya and what is happening, where are they going to what efforts are we making to secure the signs? >> yes, ma'am. we had significant arms cachet throughout the libya and many of them which is the most on both stable part in the intelligence community has assessed those continued to move. many have moved southwest towards the northern mali issue has increased the islamic mcgrath. the united states and allies have received several issues to try to stand up for. most of them are in training and equipping efforts for both the libyan army as well as libyan border control people who are benefits of some of the training we are doing. and the notes to build relationships and the court nation were doing are all focused to get this under control and limit the ability of that to continue to migrate away from libya and into the hands of terrorists. >> just so we understand, we also went to each other. the arms are going into syria. there also
. >> this toppled the 40 year regime. moment march gadhafi. they say it is going to be a long and difficult path to democracy. >>> security has been increased and four americans were killed at the consulate last september. it closed its borders to egypt and tune niche shah this weekend. >> it is a turbulent time. commemorating the anniversary of the executive order 1896 which led to the issue terrible accidentment of 1,000 japanese americans. they plan to hold a forum on the interment today. a bud his church will hold services this evening. >> the one of the most famous kisses has a home in san diego. >> 25 toot tall bronze statue with the famous times square kiss was dedicated yesterday. it is the photo of the soldier kissing the nurse for the end of world war ii. >> it is the commitment to the military and also to the veteran that is have served in so many conflicts over the years and in defending the united states in every day of the new year. >> they replace similar one that was loaned to san diego from 2000 until last year. when it was raised to create a permanent version of the statue. >>>
to bomb gadhafi on behalf of rebels we knew included al-qaeda. why wouldn't he commit our military air forces to help americans instead of al-qaeda? >> steve: yeah. i know members of your party have tried to push the white house and tried to push the president to let's connect the dots. we want to know what all happened. >> exactly. >> steve: but the white house -- >> and when. >> steve: right. we want to know all the details. but the white house, they're in no hurry to let that out because thanks to a compliant news media, nobody really is talking about this story except us and you! >> it's extraordinary because we haven't been able to interview the people that survived there, but there were sources that fox news had back at the time that said look, we heard radio traffic saying, we have dry feet over libya. that's air force terms for we got a plane over libya. now we're told, well, we never had authority to come over libya, so maybe there was a plane that came over. they could have had plane there is in an hour and a half. three at the most from croatia. that would have been c 130s.
special operators into libya to grab the guns that had been circulating during gadhafi's days 'cause they're dangerous for our people there. we had both the authors on this program earlier talking about the consequences of not telling the c.i.a., nor ambassador seasons that there was a -- stevens that there was a secret war in their country. >> compartmentalized operations going on, so the c.i.a. personnel personnel didn't have any visibility and couldn't have known there would be some sort of retaliation or blowback from these operations. >> stevens was left in a lurch. regardless of the communication issue, the state department security posture was just not what it should have been. those guys in benghazi were screaming for increased security ask they didn't get the support from the state department. >> gretchen: there is validity, that would explain why there have not been that many forth coming answers regarding benghazi and why some of the documents have not been handed over to congress. if there is some covert activity going on, then they don't want that to come out. >> eric: this m
with the gadhafi arms cachet that was not considered after the nato activity and libya and what is happening, where are they going to what efforts are we making to secure the signs? >> yes, ma'am. we had significant arms cachet throughout the libya and many of them which is the most on both stable part in the intelligence communi has assessed those continued to move. many have moved southwest towards the northern mali issue has increased the islamic mcgrath. the united states and allies have received several issues to try to stand up for. most of them are in training and equipping efforts for both the libyan army as well as libyan border control people who are benefits of some of the training we are doing. and the notes to build relationships and the court nation were doing are all focused to get this under control and limit the ability of that to continue to migrate away from libya and into the hands of terrorists. >> just so we understand, we also went to each other. the arms are going into syria. there also going into other places where they're getting in the wrong hands and tat continues as we
. that axis of sovereignty remained dominant up until 2011 when muammar gadhafi's threat to raze benghazi and kill all of its citizens represented such a serious threat to peace and security that russia and china acquiesced to u.n. resolution 1973 authorizing all necessary measures to protect civilians short of a military occupation. these countries reacted with indignation when the resolution was, in fact, used to justify regime change, and they responded by vetoing three subsequent resolutions that were intended to ratchet up the pressure on assad in syria. try to bring about a prevention or end to that terrible slaughter he's perpetrating in the civil war that's victimizing syrian citizens. as a result of these events that really bring us to the present, it is a sad reality that international consensus for intervention if all forms -- in all forms is increasingly unlikely in today's multipolar world. the one finish the way that the united states and some other countries have responded to that has been by internalizing r2p at the national level. president obama announced on the 23rd of
covered tenement in china and is one of the few people to have interviewed gadhafi. dr. len nichols of george mason university and the honorable gil wilensky, senior fellow at project hope. >> good morning. thank you for being here. i would like to thank the panel for being here. these are three of the deepest thinkers on health policy issues in the country. i am representing the shallow end of the scale here to balance it out. so you can see the stage is tipping pretty hard. [laughter] i think dr. james madara set a good tone in his opening comments. that is a good way to get into the discussion, to ask about the points he raised, especially the str, the doc fix, and transition into ways we can get physicians, patients and insurers more on board with improving medicare. and how medicare can lead the way. i know all of you have very specific spot on this subject. dr. paul ginsburg, what is the best way to get positions better involved in improving care via medicare? >> the main strategy long term is not so much to have individual positions interact with medicare in new ways but to h
Search Results 0 to 39 of about 40 (some duplicates have been removed)

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